brynndragon: (pulse taking)
If you or someone you know might be interested in acupuncture, I've got a couple of specials going on for the month of February.

First of all, gift certificates for a half-hour Relaxation Auricular Acupuncture session, usually $35, are only $20 this month - this Valentine's Day you can give a loved one the benefits of a day at the spa without disrupting their busy schedule.

Second, I've got a deal for new patients: during February all 1.5 hour initial treatments with TCM case analysis are the same price as a 1 hour follow-up treatment. If you or someone you know is thinking about trying acupuncture, this is the time to do so!

To order Relaxation Auricular Acupuncture gift certificates or schedule a treatment, you can e-mail me at BrynnK@hilldragon.com or call me at (617) 383-HILL.
brynndragon: (pulse taking)
If you or someone you know might be interested in acupuncture, I've got a couple of specials going on for the month of February.

First of all, gift certificates for a half-hour Relaxation Auricular Acupuncture session, usually $35, are only $20 this month - this Valentine's Day you can give a loved one the benefits of a day at the spa without disrupting their busy schedule.

Second, I've got a deal for new patients: during February all 1.5 hour initial treatments with TCM case analysis are the same price as a 1 hour follow-up treatment. If you or someone you know is thinking about trying acupuncture, this is the time to do so!

To order Relaxation Auricular Acupuncture gift certificates or schedule a treatment, you can e-mail me at BrynnK@hilldragon.com or call me at (617) 383-HILL.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
I'm thinking about giving an Intro to Chinese Medicine talk at my place for folks who are curious about this acupuncture thing that I do. If you might be interested, please let me know - comment, PM, email, smoke-signal, etc.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
I'm thinking about giving an Intro to Chinese Medicine talk at my place for folks who are curious about this acupuncture thing that I do. If you might be interested, please let me know - comment, PM, email, smoke-signal, etc.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
This is my terribly informal non-IRB-approved internet poll. I might use the results in a future blog post as information about how (some) people think they'd use scientific studies in their decision process to try or not try acupuncture; no names or handles or other identifying information would be included (but if you're worried, just answer the poll anonymously).

[Poll #1613614]
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
This is my terribly informal non-IRB-approved internet poll. I might use the results in a future blog post as information about how (some) people think they'd use scientific studies in their decision process to try or not try acupuncture; no names or handles or other identifying information would be included (but if you're worried, just answer the poll anonymously).

[Poll #1613614]
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
There's an article about acupuncture in WSJ that's good and pretty even-handed. Will wonders never cease :).
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
There's an article about acupuncture in WSJ that's good and pretty even-handed. Will wonders never cease :).
brynndragon: (scientist)
Leave it to the last hour of the final meeting of a class to uncover a massive complicated ethical problem that impacts all of medicine. Let me see if I can explain it, since I don't have all the study references at hand and the nature of the problem makes talking about it potentially a violation of ethics (to the point where if I had already sworn the Chinese medical equivalent of the Hippocratic Oath I don't think I could make this post at all).

long explanation is long )

Hopefully now the problem is clear: placebo is not misinformation, it is real information - what you think you know (or don't know) makes a huge difference in healthcare outcome (where you is the patient and the practitioner). Questions that come up from this include: Should we not tell patients about potential side effects so they are less likely to experience those side effects? Are those drug ads where side effects must be reported actually increasing the incidence of side effects? (I admit, I'd rather there were never any drug ads, given that pharmas are using everything I've told you to convince people they're sick and need to spend money on their drugs.) Should we keep doing RCTs, particularly of treatments that we currently believe are effective and have no alternatives, knowing that they might literally lose efficacy? Should we purposefully train doctors to be over-confident so their treatments are more effective (is this already happening unconsciously by those who train doctors)? Should practitioners be told a treatment is more effective/has fewer side effects than it really is/does if that would lead to a more positive outcome for their patients? Is it ethical to use the placebo effect for improved health? How can we be honest with our patients without breaking our oath to do no harm?

(I hope you can see why even talking about this is a problem, since what you know changes how well you can be treated for health problems - it's almost a form of Things Man Was Not Meant To Know.)
brynndragon: (scientist)
Leave it to the last hour of the final meeting of a class to uncover a massive complicated ethical problem that impacts all of medicine. Let me see if I can explain it, since I don't have all the study references at hand and the nature of the problem makes talking about it potentially a violation of ethics (to the point where if I had already sworn the Chinese medical equivalent of the Hippocratic Oath I don't think I could make this post at all).

long explanation is long )

Hopefully now the problem is clear: placebo is not misinformation, it is real information - what you think you know (or don't know) makes a huge difference in healthcare outcome (where you is the patient and the practitioner). Questions that come up from this include: Should we not tell patients about potential side effects so they are less likely to experience those side effects? Are those drug ads where side effects must be reported actually increasing the incidence of side effects? (I admit, I'd rather there were never any drug ads, given that pharmas are using everything I've told you to convince people they're sick and need to spend money on their drugs.) Should we keep doing RCTs, particularly of treatments that we currently believe are effective and have no alternatives, knowing that they might literally lose efficacy? Should we purposefully train doctors to be over-confident so their treatments are more effective (is this already happening unconsciously by those who train doctors)? Should practitioners be told a treatment is more effective/has fewer side effects than it really is/does if that would lead to a more positive outcome for their patients? Is it ethical to use the placebo effect for improved health? How can we be honest with our patients without breaking our oath to do no harm?

(I hope you can see why even talking about this is a problem, since what you know changes how well you can be treated for health problems - it's almost a form of Things Man Was Not Meant To Know.)
brynndragon: (yin yang with dragon)
It is entirely possible that deciding to factory-restore my netbook when I have some pretty hefty homework due the next day was not the wisest choice I could have made. OTOH, it takes several hours to reinstall World of Warcraft so that was one less possible distraction. I am certainly making good headway on it - it's taken me over an hour to write this post because my homework is so darn fascinating ;P.

Speaking of which, let me ask you a question: If you were to go into an acupuncturist's office, what would you expect to see there? (I'm curious what the answer is even if you've never been to an acupuncturist)

Actually, as long as you're here, let me ask you another question: When would you go to see a healer, and when would you go to see a doctor?
brynndragon: (yin yang with dragon)
It is entirely possible that deciding to factory-restore my netbook when I have some pretty hefty homework due the next day was not the wisest choice I could have made. OTOH, it takes several hours to reinstall World of Warcraft so that was one less possible distraction. I am certainly making good headway on it - it's taken me over an hour to write this post because my homework is so darn fascinating ;P.

Speaking of which, let me ask you a question: If you were to go into an acupuncturist's office, what would you expect to see there? (I'm curious what the answer is even if you've never been to an acupuncturist)

Actually, as long as you're here, let me ask you another question: When would you go to see a healer, and when would you go to see a doctor?
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
The new semester has just begun and I am indeed seeing patients at the NESA Clinic. On Wednesdays I have a Chinese-style clinic running 9AM - 2PM. On Thursdays I have a Japanese-style clinic running 4PM - 9PM. On Fridays I have another Japanese-style clinic running 9AM - 2PM. This is my third semester as an intern; interns have a master acupuncturist ensuring that our treatments are at least as awesome as you'd expect them to be. If you would like to make an appointment please call the clinic at (617) 558-6372 (dial 0 to go straight to the front desk). If you've got any questions you can e-mail me at my LJ e-mail address or leave a comment. Note that clinic fees and a FAQ can be found at the clinic website linked above as well :).

ETA: Don't forget to ask for Brynn as your intern - each clinic has multiple interns and while we're an awesome bunch I do enjoy working with people I know ;).
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
The new semester has just begun and I am indeed seeing patients at the NESA Clinic. On Wednesdays I have a Chinese-style clinic running 9AM - 2PM. On Thursdays I have a Japanese-style clinic running 4PM - 9PM. On Fridays I have another Japanese-style clinic running 9AM - 2PM. This is my third semester as an intern; interns have a master acupuncturist ensuring that our treatments are at least as awesome as you'd expect them to be. If you would like to make an appointment please call the clinic at (617) 558-6372 (dial 0 to go straight to the front desk). If you've got any questions you can e-mail me at my LJ e-mail address or leave a comment. Note that clinic fees and a FAQ can be found at the clinic website linked above as well :).

ETA: Don't forget to ask for Brynn as your intern - each clinic has multiple interns and while we're an awesome bunch I do enjoy working with people I know ;).
brynndragon: (yin yang with dragon)
According to my companion, Tiger Warmers are made of awesome if you have tight or painful shoulders and someone with clue who can use it on you. Just FYI.
brynndragon: (yin yang with dragon)
According to my companion, Tiger Warmers are made of awesome if you have tight or painful shoulders and someone with clue who can use it on you. Just FYI.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
I won't get into the politics and emotions associated with this day. Instead I'd rather share something that can help with what's happened since then. I think there's only two people who read this who would qualify and they're not currently local, but chances are you know someone who does and if so I'd appreciate it if you could pass this on (and feel free to ask me any questions):

Acupuncturists Without Borders is giving free ear acupuncture to veterans and their families on
saturdays from 10 AM-noon at the Framingham Civic League. Vets of any war are welcome, no military ID is required (this project has no association with the VA) and the only records that are kept are consent forms. The FCL is located at 214 Concord Street, Framingham, MA. The treatment is described as follows: Treatments at VAC Metrowest are based on the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) ear protocol, which has proven effective in stress reduction. Using this "community-style" model, patients sit fully clothed in a circle of chairs. Caregivers place five tiny needles on trigger points in patients' ears to restore balance and well being. Patients sit with their eyes closed in a restful state for 30 to 45 minutes to allow the needles’ healing energy to circulate through their bodies.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
I won't get into the politics and emotions associated with this day. Instead I'd rather share something that can help with what's happened since then. I think there's only two people who read this who would qualify and they're not currently local, but chances are you know someone who does and if so I'd appreciate it if you could pass this on (and feel free to ask me any questions):

Acupuncturists Without Borders is giving free ear acupuncture to veterans and their families on
saturdays from 10 AM-noon at the Framingham Civic League. Vets of any war are welcome, no military ID is required (this project has no association with the VA) and the only records that are kept are consent forms. The FCL is located at 214 Concord Street, Framingham, MA. The treatment is described as follows: Treatments at VAC Metrowest are based on the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) ear protocol, which has proven effective in stress reduction. Using this "community-style" model, patients sit fully clothed in a circle of chairs. Caregivers place five tiny needles on trigger points in patients' ears to restore balance and well being. Patients sit with their eyes closed in a restful state for 30 to 45 minutes to allow the needles’ healing energy to circulate through their bodies.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
I want to start up a blog with weekly posts about the paradigm[1] of Chinese medicine, starting with the foundational philosophical concepts and how they vary from their Western counterparts. I'll probably repost them here, but I want them to have an identity separate from this journal. If you have a blogging service that you find good to use and/or read blogs at, please let me know what they are and why you like them. Alternatively if there's a blogging service you hate from either end, I'd like to know that as well.

[1] There are some of you who hate this word (or rather, this use of it). Feel free to suggest a better one that has similar connotations.
brynndragon: (acupuncture)
I want to start up a blog with weekly posts about the paradigm[1] of Chinese medicine, starting with the foundational philosophical concepts and how they vary from their Western counterparts. I'll probably repost them here, but I want them to have an identity separate from this journal. If you have a blogging service that you find good to use and/or read blogs at, please let me know what they are and why you like them. Alternatively if there's a blogging service you hate from either end, I'd like to know that as well.

[1] There are some of you who hate this word (or rather, this use of it). Feel free to suggest a better one that has similar connotations.

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