brynndragon: (beatles love)
You guys have tons of wonderful ideas for ways to make veggies more appealing to an avowed carnivore :). So I stopped by the farmer's market in Davis and grabbed the following:

  • Green beans
  • Chinese water spinach (a green leafy veggie I'm planning on stir-frying)
  • Sugar baby watermelon
  • Beets (I forget which kind, it's red outside with white and red spiral on the inside)
  • Tomatoes (for broiling drizzled with olive oil and covered in herbs :)
  • Apples (ginger-something, good for hand-eating and browns less rapidly than most)
  • String cheese
  • Broccoli (known will-eat veggie)
  • Zucchini
  • Summer Squash


I also got some inexpensive white wine for cooking some of the veggies in. I had some of these Green Bags I bought like a year ago so I put all the veggies and fruit in them (except the watermelon, it comes with it's own green protective layer ;P). We'll see if that helps them last any longer than they would otherwise.
brynndragon: (beatles love)
You guys have tons of wonderful ideas for ways to make veggies more appealing to an avowed carnivore :). So I stopped by the farmer's market in Davis and grabbed the following:

  • Green beans
  • Chinese water spinach (a green leafy veggie I'm planning on stir-frying)
  • Sugar baby watermelon
  • Beets (I forget which kind, it's red outside with white and red spiral on the inside)
  • Tomatoes (for broiling drizzled with olive oil and covered in herbs :)
  • Apples (ginger-something, good for hand-eating and browns less rapidly than most)
  • String cheese
  • Broccoli (known will-eat veggie)
  • Zucchini
  • Summer Squash


I also got some inexpensive white wine for cooking some of the veggies in. I had some of these Green Bags I bought like a year ago so I put all the veggies and fruit in them (except the watermelon, it comes with it's own green protective layer ;P). We'll see if that helps them last any longer than they would otherwise.
brynndragon: (Tea)
My companion and I, in an effort to eat a broader base of real foods, are looking to experiment with new-to-us veggies. My companion's taste in veggies is generally more limited than mine (I even enjoy Brussel sprouts ;), so for the moment he'll be the limiting factor. He enjoys corn, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, and the rest he only likes raw: cucumbers, carrots, celery. He dislikes peppers (sweet or spicy), peas, and boiled green beans (we're going to try raw and lightly steamed green beans and see if that improves his opinion of them). The current experimentation list is: artichokes (I love these, so I'm hoping he'll like them too), spinach, kale, okra, and chinese broccoli.

This is where you come in: if you have either recipes for the above, suggestions for other veggies, or a combination of the two, please share! Being experimental for the most part I have no idea how to cook them (my mom generally went with frozen bags, which I'm liable to grab if no other suggestions for preparation appear; alternatively if it's available fresh I'll be going the "lightly steamed" route for generic prep). If you know a good sauce to put on certain veggies to make them more palpable, that would definitely be welcome as well.
brynndragon: (Tea)
My companion and I, in an effort to eat a broader base of real foods, are looking to experiment with new-to-us veggies. My companion's taste in veggies is generally more limited than mine (I even enjoy Brussel sprouts ;), so for the moment he'll be the limiting factor. He enjoys corn, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, and the rest he only likes raw: cucumbers, carrots, celery. He dislikes peppers (sweet or spicy), peas, and boiled green beans (we're going to try raw and lightly steamed green beans and see if that improves his opinion of them). The current experimentation list is: artichokes (I love these, so I'm hoping he'll like them too), spinach, kale, okra, and chinese broccoli.

This is where you come in: if you have either recipes for the above, suggestions for other veggies, or a combination of the two, please share! Being experimental for the most part I have no idea how to cook them (my mom generally went with frozen bags, which I'm liable to grab if no other suggestions for preparation appear; alternatively if it's available fresh I'll be going the "lightly steamed" route for generic prep). If you know a good sauce to put on certain veggies to make them more palpable, that would definitely be welcome as well.
brynndragon: (British)
For the food study the only things I'm allowed to have, other than the things I am given, are diet soda, black coffee, and tea (with a caveat that I shouldn't have too much caffeine). Of that set, the only thing I'll drinking willingly without sugar/honey/cream is green tea and herbal tea[1]. So as you might imagine I'm looking to expand my tea repertoire to keep me sane for the new few months. I enjoy green tea, particularly flavored green tea (I have "with pomegranate", "with blueberry", and "with lemon", all of which are good). I also like chamomile, mint, apple cinnamon, raspberry zinger. . . in fact most herbals I've tried I enjoy.

So please give me your suggestions for good tea (and places to get good tea), I'd really appreciate it.

[1] I know herbal tea isn't tea at all, but that phrase far more likely to be understood than "infusion". Understanding wins over pedantry any day.
brynndragon: (British)
For the food study the only things I'm allowed to have, other than the things I am given, are diet soda, black coffee, and tea (with a caveat that I shouldn't have too much caffeine). Of that set, the only thing I'll drinking willingly without sugar/honey/cream is green tea and herbal tea[1]. So as you might imagine I'm looking to expand my tea repertoire to keep me sane for the new few months. I enjoy green tea, particularly flavored green tea (I have "with pomegranate", "with blueberry", and "with lemon", all of which are good). I also like chamomile, mint, apple cinnamon, raspberry zinger. . . in fact most herbals I've tried I enjoy.

So please give me your suggestions for good tea (and places to get good tea), I'd really appreciate it.

[1] I know herbal tea isn't tea at all, but that phrase far more likely to be understood than "infusion". Understanding wins over pedantry any day.
brynndragon: (Default)
One of the things I noticed when examining the requirements for the study I'll be participating in is the BMI cutoff is 27. Which seems strange because the BMI cutoff for "overweight" is 25. Apparently it *was* 27 until 1998 when the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) decided to make it 25. I can't for the life of me figure out why they made that decision. They state, "The rationale behind these definitions is based on epidemiological data that show increases in mortality with BMIs above 25 kg/m2." with several references. But only one of the references implies that lowering the cutoff might be beneficial (the one that states "available evidence suggests that minimum mortality occurs at relative weights at least 10% below the US average", where the average according to this article (referenced in other places in that NHLBI document) is right around BMI = 25 for women and somewhat above that for men - which makes me wonder why the hell they picked 25). All the rest use overweight = 27 as their basis for making statements about the link between overweight/obesity and morbidity, except the WHO report (PDF). The WHO report doesn't say a damn thing about links between obesity and morbidity/mortality (being focused on malnutrition), nor does it give any specific recommendations at all about where to set BMI even for determination of malnutrition (for which it has good reasons involving the risk of overlooking important aspects of the link between height/weight/age and morbidity/mortality, and translating it into useful intervention, which the NHBLI seems to have completely ignored).

The thing I really want to point out is almost all of the data they use to support the notion that being overweight leads to increased morbidity/mortality involves a BMI >27, not a BMI >25. This might explain why the study I'm participating in uses the 27 cutoff rather than the 25 cutoff.

I probably only care because my BMI is 26. Well, that and the idea that over half of Americans are overweight is based almost entire on this change for which I've found pretty much no freaking evidence. The more I learn, the more dubious I am of our notions of healthy weight. . .
brynndragon: (Default)
One of the things I noticed when examining the requirements for the study I'll be participating in is the BMI cutoff is 27. Which seems strange because the BMI cutoff for "overweight" is 25. Apparently it *was* 27 until 1998 when the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) decided to make it 25. I can't for the life of me figure out why they made that decision. They state, "The rationale behind these definitions is based on epidemiological data that show increases in mortality with BMIs above 25 kg/m2." with several references. But only one of the references implies that lowering the cutoff might be beneficial (the one that states "available evidence suggests that minimum mortality occurs at relative weights at least 10% below the US average", where the average according to this article (referenced in other places in that NHLBI document) is right around BMI = 25 for women and somewhat above that for men - which makes me wonder why the hell they picked 25). All the rest use overweight = 27 as their basis for making statements about the link between overweight/obesity and morbidity, except the WHO report (PDF). The WHO report doesn't say a damn thing about links between obesity and morbidity/mortality (being focused on malnutrition), nor does it give any specific recommendations at all about where to set BMI even for determination of malnutrition (for which it has good reasons involving the risk of overlooking important aspects of the link between height/weight/age and morbidity/mortality, and translating it into useful intervention, which the NHBLI seems to have completely ignored).

The thing I really want to point out is almost all of the data they use to support the notion that being overweight leads to increased morbidity/mortality involves a BMI >27, not a BMI >25. This might explain why the study I'm participating in uses the 27 cutoff rather than the 25 cutoff.

I probably only care because my BMI is 26. Well, that and the idea that over half of Americans are overweight is based almost entire on this change for which I've found pretty much no freaking evidence. The more I learn, the more dubious I am of our notions of healthy weight. . .

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